Ludlow and Marches Humanists meeting, 21 November: Does God exist?

ludlowquakers-ed-sm Burt Flannery asks “Does God Exist?”

Burt had for many years been troubled by the big questions: Why are we here? How did we get here and where are we headed? And why, after tens of thousands of years of human existence, is the world so frequently characterised by man’s inhumanity and peaceful coexistence so illusory. So Burt wrote a book “What’s God got to do with it?” to consider and debate these questions.

Burt, a former mathematician and management consultant, was a keen sportsman for most of his life, until a knee injury abruptly curtailed his competitive activities.

Tuesday 21 November 2017, 7.30pm, at The Friends Meeting House, St Mary’s Lane, Ludlow SY8 1DZ

All welcome. Email for more information.

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Next meeting: 16 November, The big change in religion and belief – how might a Humanist respond?

Jeremy Rodell, Dialogue Officer of Humanists UK

Britain is currently going through what’s been called the biggest change in religion and belief landscape since the Reformation, 500 years ago. 53% of the population now say they belong to no religion, while the figure for 18-24 year olds is 71%.

But what’s really going on? What are the facts? And what are the practical implications? Can the non-religious help make it work? Jeremy Rodell is Humanists UK volunteer Dialogue Officer, and a former Trustee.

Thursday 16 November at 7.30 pm, University Centre Shrewsbury, Guildhall, Frankwell Quay, Shrewsbury SY3 8HQ. All welcome, but voluntary donations requested.

Humanists UK: Oppose plans for a surge of religiously segregated schools by writing to the Education Secretary

Jay Harman, Education Campaigns Manager of Humanists UK, writes:

Take action! Oppose plans for a surge of religiously segregated schools by writing to the Education Secretary today.

Last year the Government announced proposals to usher in a massive expansion of religious discrimination and segregation in the education system. Under the plans, the current requirement that all new ‘faith’ schools keep at least half of their places open to local children, irrespective of religion or belief, would be scrapped, meaning that all ‘faith’ schools could once again become entirely segregated in their intakes.

But now, after almost a year of campaigning by Humanists UK and its supporters, the Government is considering a u-turn.

All the evidence suggests that religious selection leads to greater segregation along religious, ethnic, and socio-economic lines, and reduces the access of local families to their local schools. In our increasingly diverse society, we should be encouraging those from different backgrounds and with different beliefs to come together, not introducing policies that will only drive them further apart.

Some people have already written to their MPs about this, or responded personally to the official consultation last year. If you are one of those people, thank you for your support, but now it’s crucial that you express your concerns directly to the Secretary of State for Education.

Please email the Secretary of State for Education Justine Greening and urge her to abandon plans to drop the 50% cap on faith-based admissions.

Our view is that there should be no ‘faith’ schools at all, but that as long as they do exist, they should have no right to discriminate. The 50% cap is an important step on the way to achieving that goal and to realising the fair, open, and inclusive education system we all want to see.

We’ve provided a template email on our website, which will be automatically emailed to the Secretary of State. You’ll also find suggestions there for how to make your response as personal as possible. The more customised your emai is, the more impact it is likely to have.

Please take action now!

Shropshire Humanist Group at the Multicultural Fun Day in Shrewsbury

Shropshire Humanist Group is taking part in the annual Multicultural Fun Day held by the Shrewsbury Interfaith Forum on Saturday 9 September, 12-4:30pm. It is held at the United Reformed Church near the English Bridge in Shrewsbury.

As in previous years, there are many varied entertainments planned, and also a children’s corner with supervised activities. John Mustafa is arranging the fine weather again and so the hall will be mainly used for refreshments and some of the entertainments. John will also very kindly provide some delicious food at a reasonable cost, and the proceeds go straight back into the Interfaith Forum to provide further funding.

Represented so far: Islam, Nichiren Buddhism, Judaism, Humanism, the LDS Church, and also the URC church. SHG is taking part to reflect our welcome of human diversity, our support for human rights and our stand against discrimination, and to emphasise that, although we live without religion, we support cultural and religious freedom, as well as freedom to live without religion.

 

15 June meeting: Blasphemy and freedom of expression – a matter of life and death, by Paul Sturges

Professor Paul Sturges OBE, Emeritus Professor of Library Studies at Loughborough University

Professor Sturges’ talk will range over the history of the offence of blasphemy in relation to freedom of expression, with examples from some different parts of the world. The examples of blasphemy will include some that would seriously offend religious believers. There will also be accounts of hangings, lashings and horrible murders by people enraged by blasphemy. He will contrast blasphemy laws and their consequences, with laws and international statements on freedom of expression.  In the process he will attempt to draw useful distinctions between critical comment, satire, offensive speech and publication, and incitement to hatred, whilst stressing the value of good manners and consideration for others.

University Centre Shrewsbury, Guildhall, Frankwell Quay, Shrewsbury SY3 8HQ, at 7.30 pm on Thursday 15 June.

BHA responds to the Archbishops’ letter

From the BHA, 6 May 2017

In a letter written to the Parishes and Chaplaincies of the Church of England ahead of the 2017 general election, the Archbishops of Canterbury and York have argued for faith to continue to play a central role in politics, and denounced the growing secularism of the United Kingdom.

In the letter, the Archbishops write:

This election is being contested against the backdrop of deep and profound questions of identity. Opportunities to renew and reimagine our shared values as a country and a United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland only come around every few generations. We are in such a time. Our Christian heritage, our current choices and our obligations to future generations and to God’s world will all play a shaping role….

Contemporary politics needs to re-evaluate the importance of religious belief. The assumptions of secularism are not a reliable guide to the way the world works, nor will they enable us to understand the place of faith in other people’s lives…

Religious belief is the well-spring for the virtues and practices that make for good individuals, strong relationships and flourishing communities. In Britain, these embedded virtues are not unique to Christians, but they have their roots in the Christian history of our four nations…

Political responses to the problems of religiously-motivated violence and extremism, at home and overseas, must… recognise that solutions will not be found simply in further secularisation of the public realm. Mainstream religious communities have a central role to play; whilst extremist narratives require compelling counter-narratives that have a strong theological and ideological foundation.

Responding to the letter, BHA Chief Executive Andrew Copson commented, ‘This is a letter to a country that no longer exists. The public today overwhelmingly recognise that sound virtues and ethics are not the preserve of the religious nor “spring” from Christianity. That is just a self-aggrandising lie, and an insult to the majority of the British people who have non-religious beliefs and values and contribute enormously to British life as they have for generations.

‘The Archbishops  are right that our country stands at a crossroads but they are wrong to say that greater religious privilege is the path that will lead to a happier future. The cause of social cohesion and a peaceful society will not be advanced by the special pleading of already powerful elites whose beliefs have no popular support, but by the creation of a shared national life that treats everyone equally, regardless of religion or belief.

‘Polls show that British people also believe that religion is already too privileged. The Church of England in particular often uses that privilege today to harm others. The most glaring example is the way in which many of its fully state-funded schools continue to turn away those of other religions and beliefs in their admissions – a practice that may shortly be extended – and shut out poorer children. If the Archbishops want to do their bit for a better Britain they should put their own house in order before lecturing others.’

Notes

For further comment or information, please contact BHA Director of Public Affairs and Policy Richy Thompson on richy@humanism.org.uk or 020 7324 3072.

Read the letter: https://humanism.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/electionletter_TEXT.pdf

The British Humanist Association is the national charity working on behalf of non-religious people who seek to live ethical and fulfilling lives on the basis of reason and humanity. It promotes a secular state and equal treatment in law and policy of everyone, regardless of religion or belief.

Why is the persecution of non-believers worsening?

Bob Churchill of the IHEU discusses the annual Freedom of Thought Report, which highlights state repression and extremist violence worldwide.

This year has seen disquieting trends in global politics: the continued prevalence of Islamist extremism in many parts of the world, and the rise of reactionary populist nativism in others. Perhaps it is no surprise then, that this year’s Freedom of Thought Report is not a happy read. This annual survey of discrimination and persecution against non-religious people across the world has been published by the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU) since 2012. Here, Bob Churchill, director of communications at the IHEU and editor of the report, answers questions about the report and the status of free thought across the world.

Read more…

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