Press

Shropshire Humanists press release January 2019. Press: For further information, please contact Richard Burnham, 07976 702099 or info@shropshire.humanist.org.uk
Our web site is shropshire.humanist.org.uk

+++ Events coming up

We have three presentations on different issues in psychology in March, April and May. These will be of great interest to the general public as well as professionals, including therapists and counsellors.

All meetings are at University Centre Shrewsbury, Guildhall, Frankwell Quay, Shrewsbury SY3 8HQ. This is a central location, near the Theatre Severn. It has wheelchair access and a hearing loop. Frankwell car park is just outside, and the venue is about 5-10 minutes walk from the station.

Meetings start at 7.30 pm. You are very welcome to come for tea and coffee from 7 pm to meet and chat with other members and guests. A voluntary donation is requested towards room hire and refreshments.

+++Thursday 21 March: Talk Yourself Better, by Ariane Sherine

Comedy writer and journalist Ariane Sherine created and organised the Atheist Bus Campaign, persuading Richard Dawkins and the British Humanist Association to support her – and buses with variations on the slogan “There’s probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life” ran in 13 countries across the globe.

As a result, Ariane received an inbox full of hate mail from Christians, which eventually led to a major nervous breakdown and suicidal ideation. She ended her journalistic career, and didn’t write again for over three years. In this talk, she will tell the full story of how therapy and medication saved her life, prompting her to write her new book, Talk Yourself Better: A Confused Person’s Guide to Therapy, Counselling and Self-Help. Ariane will be signing copies of Talk Yourself Better after the talk.

Ariane also wrote the bestselling celebrity book The Atheist’s Guide to Christmas. She has written for BBC1’s My Family, Channel 4’s Countdown and BBC2’s Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps, as well as for The Guardian, The Sunday Times, The Independent, The Independent on Sunday, The Observer, The Daily Telegraph, The Mail on Sunday, New Statesman, New Humanist and The Spectator. She lives in London with her seven-year-old daughter, Lily.

+++Thursday 18 April: Childhood Emotional Neglect: The Intergenerational Conundrum by Dr Angela Blanchard (School of Psychology, Keele University). Angela will give a presentation on her recently completed research into emotional neglect of children and how it affects them as adults. Angela is a person-centred counsellor.

+++Thursday 16 May: Pete Hulme will give an introduction to the Bahá’í faith. He intends also to discuss whether we can truly reconcile mainstream materialistic science and most transcendent spiritual traditions.

+++ About Humanists UK: humanism.org.uk

Humanists UK (formerly the British Humanist Association) is the national charity working on behalf of non-religious people who seek to live ethical and fulfilling lives on the basis of reason and humanity.It is a charitable company, formed in 1896 and incorporated in 1928.

Humanists UK is trusted by over 40,000 members and supporters and over 70 local and special interest affiliates to promote Humanism. Its policies are informed with the support of over 130 of the UK’s most prominent philosophers, scientists, and other thinkers and experts and it seeks to advance them with the help of over 100 parliamentarians in membership of the All Party Parliamentary Humanist Group. Its trained and accredited celebrants conduct funerals and other non-religious ceremonies attended by over 800,000 people each year.

What does it want? It wants a world where everyone lives cooperatively on the basis of shared human values, respect for human rights, and concern for future generations. It wants non-religious people to be confident in living ethical and fulfilling lives on the basis of reason and humanity.

What does it do? It promotes Humanism, works on behalf of the non-religious, and supports those who wish to live humanist lives, including through the provision of humanist ceremonies. It campaigns for a secular state, challenges religious privilege, and promotes equal treatment in law and policy of everyone regardless of religion or belief. It offers a humanist perspective in public debate, drawing on contemporary humanist thought and the worldwide humanist tradition.

+++ About humanism:

Throughout recorded history there have been non-religious people who have believed that this life is the only life we have, that the universe is a natural phenomenon with no supernatural side, and that we can live ethical and fulfilling lives on the basis of reason and humanity. They have relied on the scientific method, evidence and reason to discover truths about the universe and placed human welfare and happiness at the centre of their ethical decision making.

Today, people who share these beliefs and values are called humanists and this combination of attitudes is called Humanism. Many millions of people in Britain share this way of living and of looking at the world, but many of them have not heard the word ‘humanist’ and don’t realise that it describes what they believe.

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